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Posts Tagged ‘Violence’

Funny. I attended a training session at work in which I was asking some of the same questions, along with my fellow advocates. Never imagined that when I was home, I would come upon an article so much on point.

There is much to learn about the domestic violence and all the cultures around the world, and in our very own backyard here in the United States of America. We think of ourselves as such a progressive nation; however, it is completely eye opening when we open our eyes only to realize that we may not have come as far along as we have hoped.

Here’s to hoping and praying that we can all be the change.

8/24/2011 11:13:00 AM
New hope to American Indian
women facing domestic violence
Navajo-Hopi Observer

WASHINGTON, D.C. – An international human rights body has done something that federal courts, including the United States Supreme Court, failed to do – bring justice to a domestic violence survivor.

“This decision is important for Native women who face the highest rates of sexual and physical assault of any group in the United States,” said Jana Walker, Indian Law Resource Center attorney. “Although this case did not originate in Indian Country, it has major implications for an ethnic group who rarely sees their abusers brought to justice.”

On Aug. 17, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights issued a landmark decision in Jessica Lenahan (Gonzales) v. United States. The decision is the first women’s human rights case involving domestic violence brought before an international body against the United States. The Commission determined that the United States violated its obligations under international human rights laws by failing to use due diligence and reasonable measures to protect Ms. Lenahan and her daughters from violence by her estranged husband.

The case was based on a tragic incident in 1999, involving the deliberate failure of the Castle Rock, Colorado police to enforce a domestic violence restraining order. Ms. Lenahan had repeatedly called the police for help after her estranged husband kidnapped her three children in violation of the order. Ten hours after Ms. Lenahan’s first call, the husband drove to the police station, where he and the three children were killed in an exchange of gunfire. Ms. Lenahan sought justice in the federal courts, including the United States Supreme Court, for violation of her rights by the police.

After the United States Supreme Court held that women do not have a constitutional right to have civil protection orders enforced by the police, Town of Castle Rock, Colo. v. Gonzales, 545 U.S. 748 (2005), Ms. Lenahan filed a petition with the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights alleging that the United States’ failure to act with due diligence to prevent violence against women violated its obligations under international human rights law.

In 2008, the Indian Law Resource Center and Sacred Circle National Resource Center to End Violence Against Native Women filed a friend-of-the-court brief with the Commission in support of Ms. Lenahan, on behalf of numerous non-profit organizations and tribal governments working to end violence against Native women. In its decision, the Commission took notice of this brief and acknowledged that domestic violence has a disproportionate impact on Native women and other low income minority women.

“We want our voices to be heard around this case, because the United States Supreme Court decision had vast implications for Native women and the enforcement of tribal protection orders by state law enforcement officials,” said Terri Henry, Co-chair of the National Congress of American Indians Task Force on Violence Against Women and Principal Director of Clan Star, Inc. “Violence against Native women in the United States has reached epidemic proportions. One out of three Native women will be raped in her lifetime, and three out of four will be physically assaulted.”

Because the United States has greatly limited tribal criminal jurisdiction and sentencing authority, often the only recourse that Native women have against their abusers is a civil protection order.

“By allowing state l

Read more at www.navajohopiobserver.com

 

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I think it is fabulous that FMLA and some of the States’ own laws are working together to help provide a dv an opportunity to tend to certain things related to care and empowering moving forward to being a survivor. Hopefully all 50 statesw will follow suit as well.

Amplify’d from www.nolo.com

Victims of domestic violence may have the right to take time off work.

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If you are the victim of domestic violence, you may have the right to take time off from work. The federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and some state laws allow domestic violence victims to take leave from work in certain circumstances.  

Domestic violence — mental or physical abuse at the hands of an intimate partner — often affects the victims’ ability to work. According to Legal Momentum, an advocacy group, victims of domestic violence lose an average of 137 hours of work a year. Some need time off to seek medical attention, seek a restraining order, or relocate to a safe place. Others are prevented from getting to work when an abuser disables or takes the car, sabotages childcare arrangements, or leaves the victim without cash to use public transportation.

These problems have led a number of states to pass domestic violence leave laws, which give victims of domestic violence the right to take time off for certain reasons. Some states allow those who are victims of, or witnesses to, a crime to take time off to attend court proceedings; these laws protect victims of domestic violence, although they also apply more generally. And, the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) may also provide a right to leave for some domestic violence victims.

Read more at www.nolo.com

 

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Step up and volunteer for our youth. Great venue on August 26th, needing plenty of folks to assist, with a great cause. If you can #volunteer, please do! Many ways to volunteer…just check out the form!

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OMG, just read a blog posting that an author stated that,

“There is an oft-repeated, but false, myth that Super Bowl Sunday is the worst day for violence against women.” 

Of course, the author then adds,

“Would that it were that easy.  Domestic violence doesn’t care what day it is.  It is an every day (and everyday) problem of individuals, families, and society as a whole.  The solution to domestic violence cannot, by definition, take place only within the family unit.  It is a public health issue if ever there was one.”

The first sentence sent the hair up on the back of my neck — MYTH?  a fallacy???  I don’t think so!!  I have been working in the domestic violence field for more than 5 years now, not counting the 15 years that I have been a paralegal and the many years of physical and emotional domestic violence that I personally encountered for many years, and yesterday was probably the first experience I had had with working specifically on Superbowl Sunday in this industry and I wrote the following on another site…..

entitled, “Underdogs come up and win! Thank goodness someone did!!!”

Today has been a rough day for me. For many that know, I answer crisis calls for a living. That, in itself isn’t too bad because I generally can separate myself from their pain and move forward to the next caller.

Today, it has been different. Perhaps, it is because I have never worked in this field on Superbowl Sunday; I don’t know. It seems like I had before, but I don’t remember it being this rough.

Superbowl for most people can be all fun and games, but from the domestic violence perspective it can be quite the opposite. I have been receiving higher risk crisis calls today percentage wise than I ever have, I believe. I mean, usually, it is just calls wanting more information or how to plan to help from friends or family members OR understanding how they need to understand why they need to stay away from the abusive person OR some students wanting help on their projects.

Today, though….

* a woman’s face was bashed in by her ex and she just returned home from the hospital. Her ex was on the way to p/u the kids and she needed to ensure their safety until she could reach the attorney and the district attorney in the morning….

* callers calling from places they are hiding from their abusers….

* callers from the other room while there abusive partner was enjoying the superbowl game after having beaten them up. They were seeking shelter space….

* callers wanting us to call 911 for them…

* caller stating that her husband had just “disciplined” her daughter by yanking her hair and dragging her through the house and throwing her into the doorway. The daughter now has a concussion….

* other child abuse calls being called in….

and sooooo much more.

It is times like these when one gets these sort of calls you would like to be able to hang up the phone and call “The Equalizer” to take care of things. I guess I always loved that show because the actor would do so in a not necessarily violent way to get the point across to the aggressor — a sort of person who advocated for the underdog.

It is sort of the peace de la resistance (sp?) in the fact that, at least, one underdog has won today — even if it is from an event that seems to masks the pain of others in the same day.

Some day — I wish the pains of the victims away and the abusive/aggressive folks of this world find peace so that we can all live in the world as one happy family. Is it really too much to ask for???

Now, try to tell me, after my experience yesterday on a domestic violence hotline, that Superbowl Sunday isn’t one of the worst days ever for domestic violence.

In all fairness though, there are hundreds (and sometimes thousands) of calls received day in and day out throughout the entire year.  Domestic violence isn’t just domestic violence on Superbowl Sunday; however, the intensity culminates to something that is both exasperating and emotional.

Some day…..

the violence in the home has to end!

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“Grace will lead me home” – the title of the book she is promoting and speaking out about domestic violence, bringing home to a lot of victims of domestic exactly the fears, trials and tribulations that they have faced and feared.  Check out her story in these YouTube videos:

 

 

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xcZg2_BDZKo]

– Robin Givins Story, Pt 1

 

 

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SkgsHX2g0w]

– Robin Givins Story, Pt 2

 

 

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RVFaEJDO_zs%5D

– Robin Givins on ABC  (NOTE: sad to see the hate comments left on this video)

  

“You have to talk about it to conquer it!” – Robin Givins

(what a great quote!!)

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